'I feel and think much as you do, care about many of the things you care about, although most people do not care about them. You are not alone.' Kurt Vonnegut

Friday, April 13, 2012

Notes About The Dead Woman (Effervescence)

Part II




1. About the Dead Woman and Effervescence


The dead woman carries her water source deep within.
On some days, bubbles may mantle the surface of her inner peace, and rise.
Effervescence kept in check may be seen in a glimmer, or the way the corners
       of her lips part, fractionally, when she smiles.
She is not a fan of ebullient personalities, or shows of excess joy, grief, humour,
       all except anger, which she does very well.
The fermentation of discontent is kept quiet within the barrel of the rib-cage,
       though a sudden spark may set the eye-stinging fumes alight, with nothing
       but cinders to sweep up in the aftermath, and tears to wipe.
The dead woman reads poetry in the same way, she feels the immediate fizz of every
       word upon her tongue, the language is a tumult of her soul.






2. More About the Dead Woman and Effervescence


The dead woman reads the spasms of passion like braille upon her skin.
She quickens to froth at the slightest touch.
A touch, a shudder, a shivery pulse which leaves the soft hair of the belly
       standing on end, and all her bubbles will rise through lovely matter.
The intoxication of words spoken in the dark aerates the platelets of her blood,
       and sings a bell-like note in her inner ear, pounding.
The dead woman is impetuous.
She becomes unbound, light as spindrift above the surf and spray and
       salt crystals of sex.
And she writes poetry in the same way, with a vehemence of quivering,
       and the turbulence of impatient need to set each word upon the page
       before it dissolves in light.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Shay has asked us to share a favourite poem of our own on Fireblossom Friday. When no particular poem sprang to mind, I browsed through my archives and came across the several pieces I wrote based on Marvin Bell's 'Dead Man' poetry. I remember really enjoying this approach to writing: a collection of statements, observations in keeping with the Zen philosophy: "Live as if you are already dead." Hard to state that this specific poem stands as my favourite, but I felt a sense of accomplishment when writing the series, as if - for once - I knew what I was doing. 

15 November 2013

37 comments:

  1. At least Dead woman feels something. She feels passion for various things. All is not lost. :)

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  2. The dead woman reads the spasms of passion like braille upon her skin.
    She quickens to froth at the slightest touch.


    This and ALL really bursting forth passionately, Kerry! Really such full writing!

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  3. I always have to keep in mind that this is someone living life as if they were dead...makes a huge difference than a dead woman (literally or metaphorically)...at least for me, changes the whole dynamic. Whew....the contrasting sides of the same one dead with only one lover and one dead with the chance for two. this was really good, it made me a bit anxious...and a bit romantic...a bit of a lot of things really. Great wrk.

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    1. The "dead" woman is definitely not dead, (neither is the "dead" man) but lives as if she were, on a plain closer to earth and closer to her spiritual self. Thus, her life is lifted above the mundane constraints into magical realism. She has two loves, with whom she has fused her living being: the "dead" man, and poetry.

      This is how I see the character - but I love that everyone interprets it in a way that makes sense to them.

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  4. The sensations and imagery of the words are lovely ~

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  5. I love that she carries her water source deep within......the fizz of words upon her tongue.....a vehemence of quivering....wow, kiddo, you took a glorious spin on the prompt word...........This will be a very interesting series to read one after the other, when you have completed them. Am thinking: chap book? Lulu.com?

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  6. I am intrigued by this form, this subject matter. It provides some
    fantastical nuance to a view that mitigates and assuages the 'fear' that most attempt to process prior to their own death.
    That the unknown can possibly be viewed as exciting and not just a termination of one's perpetuity

    Gracias for this perspective at least to me

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  7. I love this, Kerry! You are so creative. My favorites are the endings about reading and writing poetry and this: "fermentation of discontent is kept quiet"

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  8. Very nice expose of the (not!) dead woman. I do like poetry like this, started a dead oak poem in similar vein some time ago... perhaps I should return to it, let it see the light of day.

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  9. ...she is dead because she doesn't allow herself to express her real emotions... ? this is really different for me to read... Not saying I don't like it, just trying to understand it. I read what you wrote to Herotomost... Maybe I will google it. Thanks... it is always interesting to learn something new.

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    1. My explanation to Corey is not necessarily the original idea, it is how I am approaching the notion of 'Dead Man Poetry' which is Marvin Bell's invention. I think Nan explains the concept far better than I have, so follow the link below, if you are interested in learning more, or google Bell. I see my 'dead woman' developing over a few more poems - I'm quite charmed by her - but I totally understand that she may not be for everyone.

      Nan's post: http://jadepagepress.blogspot.com/2012/04/about-dead-man-hidden-in-plain-sight.html?m=1

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  10. living but feeling dead...a painful existence. Beautiful writing Kerry, just beautiful as always.

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  11. I'm loving your dead man poetry, Kerry. This is so beautiful. I really like-

    The dead woman reads the spasms of passion like braille upon her skin.
    She quickens to froth at the slightest touch.

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  12. aaah i am behind in my reading and look what i missed! fascinating!

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  13. like the a lotus leaf.....in and out at the same moment....I loved reading this....maybe I misinterpreted or may be.....Enjoyed!

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  14. Kerry, thanks for the effervescence! She is like a beautiful bottle of sparkling water. The top comes off, the magic contents spill over but never run out. Maybe she is the entire Spring.

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  15. The dichotomy of death and effervescence is truly stunning. I can see why you licked this one.

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  16. I remember these, and how much you seemed to enjoy creating them. I'd have sworn I commented at the time, but maybe not. My favorite line is that the dead woman is impetuous!

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  17. I like this going back and rooting up some of the great ones. I too liked this naked little jaunt you took with the dead woman poetry. It seems to allow more room to take what's within and get it out without necessarily feeling violated by sharing some most personal thoughts. Nice to read these again SA...

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  18. "...as if - FOR ONCE - I knew what I was doing." ~ you may not think you know what you're doing (which astounds me!) but you are among the top ten best poets i have EVER read. LOVE these, as i love all your poems!


    dani

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  19. I have always loved your dead woman poems. And am especially fond of the first one, where she carries her water source deep within. That is such a wonderful thing to ponder. Beautiful work, Kerry. I have been reading your work since 2010 and have been in awe of your work with every single poem!!!!

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  20. i'm really digging reading these. you've probably gathered by now that I favor the edge, the limit, the liminal, the crossover, the other: and this poem accomplishes that so fluidly. really love this, Kerry. ~

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  21. I can totally see why this one gave you great satisfaction, Kerry--and why you chose it today. I think it is some of the finest wordsmithing I've laid eyes on, and wish I had written even one of those vivid lines--the imagery is very in keeping with the magical realism approach, and indeed, it just is magical from beginning to end. Thanks for digging the non-dead, dead woman up and letting her amaze us.

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  22. Kerry, these are so beautiful...Writing allows that which bubbles within to spill forth in words...we can expose our souls openly or stand in the shadow of a character we create when we wish to hold onto anonymity. So happy you chose this poetry for us to revisit.

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  23. What an interesting approach Kerry. I was not aware of the Dead Man poems or of the Zen concept so these were doubly interesting.

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  24. Your opening line floors me.

    I'm familiar with this feeling, "The fermentation of discontent is kept quiet within the barrel of the rib-cage," what a unique way of stating pent up resentment and/or discontent.

    I still love the line that I loved before and the idea of love bringing the dead woman to life.

    Gorgeous writing, Kerry I'm so glad you shared this one!

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  25. This is a declaration of swoon-worthy! Bravo for the refinement of woman kind and your poem!

    "The dead woman is impetuous.
    She becomes unbound, light as spindrift above the surf and spray and
    salt crystals of sex."

    I am so glad you shared this!

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  26. I am charmed by 'her' ... And you!

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  27. She quickens to froth at the slightest touch.
    A touch, a shudder, a shivery pulse which leaves the soft hair of the belly
    standing on end, and all her bubbles will rise through lovely matter.

    Indeed!
    The dead woman. What a wonderful vehicle for allowing life to seep through moist earth and inhabit us all.

    Indeed!

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  28. I love the sense of rousing that comes from poetry upon the dead woman, and how effervescence here is an awakening of something from nothing. Read from the otherworld, we are dead people until we partake of Their communion, in sex or dream or poetry. Only then are we sensate to Their realities. An exquisite take on all that, Kerry finely carved, a joy to read.

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  29. These are just wonderful--the details, the language, the pacing--just terrific, Kerry--poems I wish I had written--really enjoyed. k.

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  30. i love this series. now i want to read them all again. LOVE.
    (as an aside, this is in Such Tiny Font, on my computer at least, that my old eyes cursed at me while reading it even with my reading glasses on. what gives?) xo

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    1. Thanks for mentioning the problem with font size, though it is the same Georgia normal that I have always used on Skylover. I'll check the point size and adjust it.

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